Top 5 Poems on Shmoop for April (National Poetry Month)

Alas, t’is time to bid National Poetry Month a fond adieu.

Rather than go all misty-eyed, choked-up, broken-heartedly emo on you, we wanted to mark the end of the month on a celebratory note. Voila, our Poetry Top 5 lists.

Most Popular Poems on Shmoop for April, 2009

  1. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, by T.S. Eliot
  2. The Raven, by Edgar Allan Poe
  3. My Last Duchess, by Robert Browning
  4. Ozymandias, by Percy Bysshe Shelley
  5. Death, be not proud (Holy Sonnet 10), by John Donne

Most-Searched Poets on Shmoop for April, 2009

  1. Emily Dickinson
  2. Robert Frost
  3. Langston Hughes
  4. John Donne
  5. Walt Whitman

Fall for any of the 54 Poetry Study Guides in Shmoop Poetry

Also, remember that today (April 30) is Poem in Your Pocket Day. Read a poem to the people you love. Or want to love. Go get ‘em, Tyger.

New this Week on Shmoop!

New this Week on Shmoop Literature

“Bartleby the Scrivener,” by Herman Melville

“Dr. Heidegger’s Experiment,” by Nathaniel Hawthorne

An Ideal Husband, by Oscar Wilde

No Longer At Ease, by Chinua Achebe

Twelfth Night, by William Shakespeare

New this Week on Shmoop Poetry

“Fire and Ice,” by Robert Frost

“Tintern Abbey,” by William Wordsworth

“Ulysses” (poem), by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

“When I Consider How My Light is Spent,” by John Milton

April is National Poetry Month

How do we love poetry? Let us count the ways…

We receive a lot of love from teachers and students for our analysis and coverage of poetry. Students tell us that they are naturally drawn to poetry, but often feel stymied by the difficulty of interpreting and analyzing the subject. Shmoop is here to help.

There’s really only one reason that poetry has gotten a reputation for being so darned “difficult”: it demands your full attention and won’t settle for less.

To help teachers and students get more comfortable with poetry, we offer a Shmoop Poetry Primer:

What would you like to see us add to our Poetry Primer? What are your favorite tips and tricks for teaching and understanding poetry?